Resource | Research | Payment Accuracy and Program Integrity
The Extent of Trafficking in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program: 2012–2014

Trafficking of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits occurs when SNAP recipients sell their benefits for cash to food retailers, often at a discount. Although trafficking does not increase costs to the Federal Government, it is a diversion of program benefits from their intended purpose of helping low-income families access a nutritious diet. This report, the latest in a series of periodic analyses, provides estimates of the extent of trafficking during the period 2012 through 2014.

Resource | Research | General/Other
Nutrition Assistance In Farmers Markets: Understanding the Shopping Patterns of SNAP Participants

This study was undertaken to understand why some SNAP participants shop at farmers markets and others in the same geographic area do not.

Resource | Research | Assessing/Improving Operations
Nutrition Assistance in Farmers Markets: Understanding Current Operations

This study describes how farmers markets and direct marketing farmers operate and their perceive d benefits and barriers to accepting SNAP.

Resource | Research | Assessing/Improving Operations
Evaluation of the Expanded Off-Line EBT System in Ohio

This report describes how the Direction Card system works; the process undertaken by ODJFS and its EBT vendor to design, develop, and test the system; the implementation process and experiences; and the cost of system design, development, and implementation. Volume 2 of this report compares the ongoing administrative costs of system operations and system levels of benefit loss and diversion with those of on-line EBT systems and the Dayton pilot.

Resource | Research | Assessing/Improving Operations
Relaxing The FSP Vehicle Asset Test: Findings From The North Carolina Demonstration

This report analyzes the findings from North Carolina’s Vehicle Exclusion Limit Demonstration (VELD), which excluded one vehicle per household, regardless of value, from the Food Stamp Program’s countable asset limit. Under current law, for most families, only the first $4,650 of the first vehicle’s value is excluded. Some have argued that because a reliable vehicle is often required to find and hold a job, the entire value of the first vehicle should be excluded.