Resource | Research | Assessing/Improving Operations
An Assessment of the Roles and Effectiveness of Community-Based Organizations in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program

This study examined program outcomes such as procedural denials and application timeliness when applicant interviews were conducted by community-based organizations (CBOs) staff to outcomes when SNAP staff conducted applicant interviews in 4 states - Florida, Michigan, Nevada, and Texas.

Resource | Research | Assessing/Improving Operations
Evaluation of the 2004/2005 Food Stamp Outreach Projects

The Food Stamp Program (FSP) is the Nation’s largest nutrition assistance program. About 1 of every 11 Americans participated in 2006. The program and its benefits are available to almost all eligible households whose income and assets fall below national eligibility thresholds. The participation rate among people eligible for benefits has increased in recent years (to 65 percent in 2005). However, many low-income people do not receive the nutrition assistance benefits to which they are entitled. The Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) is committed to making sure that all those eligible for food stamp benefits are able to access the program. To help meet that goal, over the last several fiscal years, FNS has awarded a series of grants to local organizations that, in turn, conduct outreach activities to educate potentially eligible individuals about the FSP and to
facilitate their access. FNS awarded nearly $2 million to 16 food stamp outreach projects in fiscal years 2004 and 2005. These projects are the focus of this report. The report describes the project goals and strategies, provides a general description of each grantee, and gives a synopsis of project performance. Performance is based on grantees’ self-evaluation.

Resource | Research | Assessing/Improving Operations
An Assessment of the Sustainability of Food Stamp Outreach Projects

Over recent years the Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) has awarded multiple grants to community and faith-based organizations (CFBO) and public entities to reach out to people who are eligible but not participating in the Food Stamp Program (FSP). Grant amounts ranged from $100,000 to $350,000 and extended from one to two years. While grant proposals routinely address the question of whether and how projects will be sustained beyond the grant period, no follow-up information about the extent to which these projects have been sustained has been available to date. This report documents the extent to which CFBOs and the public entities that received food stamp outreach grants in 2001 and 2002 sustained their outreach projects up to three years beyond the funding period, challenges faced in sustaining their projects, and the factors contributing to their sustainability.

Resource | Research | Assessing/Improving Operations
Evaluation of the Expanded Off-Line EBT System in Ohio

This report describes how the Direction Card system works; the process undertaken by ODJFS and its EBT vendor to design, develop, and test the system; the implementation process and experiences; and the cost of system design, development, and implementation. Volume 2 of this report compares the ongoing administrative costs of system operations and system levels of benefit loss and diversion with those of on-line EBT systems and the Dayton pilot.

Resource | Research | Assessing/Improving Operations
Relaxing The FSP Vehicle Asset Test: Findings From The North Carolina Demonstration

This report analyzes the findings from North Carolina’s Vehicle Exclusion Limit Demonstration (VELD), which excluded one vehicle per household, regardless of value, from the Food Stamp Program’s countable asset limit. Under current law, for most families, only the first $4,650 of the first vehicle’s value is excluded. Some have argued that because a reliable vehicle is often required to find and hold a job, the entire value of the first vehicle should be excluded.

Resource | Research | Assessing/Improving Operations
Evaluation of the E&T/JOBS Conformance Demonstrations

From October 1, 1993 to September 30, 1996, the Food and Nutrition Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture sponsored demonstration projects in Georgia, Hawaii, Missouri, South Dakota, and Texas to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of operating the Food Stamp Employment and Training (E&T) program under the same legislative and regulatory terms as the Job Opportunities and Basic Skills (JOBS) program for Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) recipients. Common objectives of the demonstrations were to increase compliance with E&T participation requirements among mandatory work registrants, target services to individuals most at risk of long-term dependency and those most likely to benefit from E&T services, improve participant outcomes, and improve the cost efficiency of welfare to work services.

Resource | Research | Assessing/Improving Operations
Evaluation of Food Retailer Compliance Management Demonstrations in EBT Ready States and Related Initiatives

This study evaluates the Retailer Compliance Management Demonstrations in EBT-ready States. In these demonstrations, the State food stamp agencies in New Mexico (NM) and South Carolina (SC) assumed responsibility for managing the participation of food retailers in the FSP, a task previously managed exclusively by the federal government.

Resource | Research | Assessing/Improving Operations
Evaluation of Food Retailer Compliance Management Demonstrations in EBT-Ready States and Related Initiatives: Summary of Study of State Law Enforcement Agreements

The report is based on a telephone survey of all States with SLEB agreements and case studies of 6 States with noteworthy levels of SLEB agreement-generated activity.

Resource | Research | Assessing/Improving Operations
The Impacts of Off-Line Electronic Benefits Transfer Demonstration

The objectives of the demonstration were to determine the technological feasibility of offline EBT; whether it would be accepted by stakeholder groups; and whether it would be cost-effective.

Resource | Research | Assessing/Improving Operations
The Evaluation of the Alabama Food Stamp Cash-Out Demonstration

A fundamental issue in the design of the Food Stamp Program (FSP) is the form benefits should take. Advocates of the current coupon system argue that coupons are a direct and inexpensive way to ensure that food stamp benefits are used to purchase food; that, despite some evidence of fraud and benefit diversion under the current system, the unauthorized use of food stamps is relatively limited; and that coupons provide some measure of protection to food budgets from other demands on limited household resources. Advocates of replacing coupons with cash argue that the current system limits the food purchasing choices of participants, places a stigma on participation; and entails excessive costs for coupon issuance, transaction, and redemption.