Resource | Research | Demonstrations
Summer Electronic Benefits Transfer for Children (SEBTC) Demonstration: Evaluation Findings for the Full Implementation Year 2012 Final Report

The Summer Electronic Benefits Transfer for Children (SEBTC) demonstration offered a rigorous test of the impact of providing a monthly benefit of $60 per child - using existing electronic benefit transfer (EBT) systems - on food insecurity among children during the summer when school meals are not available. In the second year of operations, when the demonstration was fully implemented, the evaluation found that this approach could reach up to 75 percent of eligible children and reduce the prevalence of very low food security among children by about one-third.

Resource | Research | Demonstrations
Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP): Improper Payments Data Collection Pilot Project

The Improper Payments Information Act of 2002 (Public Law 107-300) (IPIA) requires all Federal agencies to calculate the amount of erroneous payments in Federal programs and to periodically conduct detailed assessments of vulnerable program components. The Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) subsidizes children's meals and snacks in participating day care centers and family day care homes (FDCHs). The purpose of this pilot was to test possible methods that could lead to valid estimations of the number of meals served by FDCHs. The estimated number of meals served can be used to develop estimates of over- and under-counts of meal claims by FDCH providers that result in erroneous payments.

Resource | Research | Assessing/Improving Operations
Direct Verification Pilot Study: First Year Report

On an average school day, the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) provides subsidized meals to approximately 30 million school children, including 18 million low-income children. To ensure program integrity, school districts must select a sample of household applications for free or reduced-price meals, contact the households, and verify eligibility. This process (known as household verification) can be burdensome for both school officials and households. Some households do not respond to verification requests. When this happens, children may lose the free or reduced-price benefits even though they may be eligible for those benefits. Direct verification uses information collected by means-tested programs to verify eligibility for free and reduced-price meals without contacting applicants. Potential benefits of direct verification include: enhanced program integrity, less burden for households when no contact is needed, less work for school district officials, and fewer students with school meal benefits terminated because of non-response to verification requests. The Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act of 2004 (P.L. 108-265) permits direct verification of school meal applications and requires the Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of direct verification (instead of household verification) by school district.

Resource | Research | Assessing/Improving Operations
Evaluation of Food Retailer Compliance Management Demonstrations in EBT Ready States and Related Initiatives

This study evaluates the Retailer Compliance Management Demonstrations in EBT-ready States. In these demonstrations, the State food stamp agencies in New Mexico (NM) and South Carolina (SC) assumed responsibility for managing the participation of food retailers in the FSP, a task previously managed exclusively by the federal government.

Resource | Research | Assessing/Improving Operations
Evaluation of Food Retailer Compliance Management Demonstrations in EBT-Ready States and Related Initiatives: Summary of Study of State Law Enforcement Agreements

The report is based on a telephone survey of all States with SLEB agreements and case studies of 6 States with noteworthy levels of SLEB agreement-generated activity.

Resource | Research | Payment Accuracy and Program Integrity
The Extent of Trafficking in the Food Stamp Program

This study was the first in a series of studies that estimated the extent of retailer-level SNAP benefit trafficking. The major findings included large stores having only half the store violation rate that smaller stores had. Additionally, the overall benefit trafficking rate was 13.0% as compared to 1.3% in the latest trafficking rate study.