Resource | Research
Community Eligibility Provision Evaluation

The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act (HHFKA) provided schools and districts that predominately serve low-income children with a new option for meal certification.  Under the Community Eligibility Provision, schools do not collect or process meal applications for free and reduced-price meals served in the National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program.  Schools must serve all meals at no cost with any costs in excess of the Federal reimbursement paid from non-Federal sources.  The evaluation, mandated by HHFKA, examined the implementation and impacts of the Community Eligibility Provision.

Resource | Research | Assessing/Improving Operations
Eating Breakfast: Effects of the School Breakfast Program

The analysis conducted in this study builds on these two strands of the literature and uses three alternate definitions of breakfast: Consumption of any food or beverage. Breakfast intake of food energy greater than 10 percent of the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA). Consumption of foods from at least two of five main food groups and intake of food energy greater than 10 percent of the RDA. As the definition of breakfast becomes more robust, the percentage of students who eat breakfast declines. Almost 9 of 10 students consumed any food or beverage, but only 6 of 10 students consumed food from at least two of the main food groups and had breakfast intake of food energy greater than 10 percent of the RDA.

Resource | Research | Policy Analysis
State Food Stamp Policy Choices Under Welfare Reform: Findings of 1997 50-State Survey

The report presents the results of a survey conducted with every state during November and December 1997 to gather detailed information on state options taken in six main areas, with particular focus on time limits and work requirements for able-bodied adults without dependents (ABAWDs) and on food stamp sanctions.

Resource | Research | Participation Characteristics
Charactertics of Childless Unemployed Adult and Legal Immigrant Food Stamp Participants: Fiscal Year 1995

The Adolescent WIC Participants Study was a national survey of adolescent women enrolled in the WIC program and WIC clinic directors. Approximately 15 percent of the women served by the WIC program are adolescents. This study was designed to describe the characteristics of adolescent women in WIC, as well as to identify their special needs, such as nutrition education, referral to other agencies, and their satisfaction with the services they received. The Adolescent WIC Participants Study was the first national survey of pregnant teenagers and mothers served by the WIC program. Following a series of 24 focus groups with WIC adolescents and program staff to clarify the study issues, the study team conducted a multi-stage survey of 297 WIC clinic directors and 2,649 adolescents, 14 to 19 years of age, who visited WIC clinics during a 60-day period in the first half of 1997.

Resource | Research | Food Security
Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program: Examining the Evidence to Define Benefit Adequacy

The purpose of this study was to examine how to define “adequacy” of SNAP allotments objectively in the context of program goals to improve food security and access to a healthy diet, existing data sources that could inform an assessment of the adequacy of existing and potential alternative SNAP allotments, and new data requirements to strengthen the evidence-base and allow for further rigorous analyses.  It examined whether it is feasible to objectively define “adequacy”, and to determine what data and analysis were needed to create an evidence based assessment of “adequacy”. This report is available here by permission. It may also be obtained through the Institute of Medicine website.

Resource | Research | Assessing/Improving Operations
Evaluation of the E&T/JOBS Conformance Demonstrations

From October 1, 1993 to September 30, 1996, the Food and Nutrition Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture sponsored demonstration projects in Georgia, Hawaii, Missouri, South Dakota, and Texas to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of operating the Food Stamp Employment and Training (E&T) program under the same legislative and regulatory terms as the Job Opportunities and Basic Skills (JOBS) program for Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) recipients. Common objectives of the demonstrations were to increase compliance with E&T participation requirements among mandatory work registrants, target services to individuals most at risk of long-term dependency and those most likely to benefit from E&T services, improve participant outcomes, and improve the cost efficiency of welfare to work services.

Resource | History
A Short History of SNAP

939 – The First Food Stamp Program