Resource | Policy Memos | FNS-GD-2013-0065
SNAP- Able Bodied Adults without Dependents Waivers for Fiscal Year 2014

This memo provides the list of states that are eligible to waive SNAP participation time limits for Able Bodied Adults without Dependents (ABAWDs) for FY 2014. Under SNAP regulations at 7 CFR 273.24(f)(2), a state can qualify for a 12-month statewide ABA WD waiver if the Department of Labor (DOL) Unemployment Insurance Service determines that it qualifies for extended unemployment benefits.

Resource | Policy Memos | FNS-GD-2011-0062
FY 2012 Allocations of New 15% Exemptions for Able Bodied Adults without Dependents - Not Adjusted for Carryover

The Food and Nutrition Act restricts the amount of time that able-bodied adults without dependents (ABAWDs) may participate in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) to 3 months in a 36-month period, unless the ABAWD meets certain
work requirements or is exempted by the state. SNAP regulations at 7 CFR 273.24(g) provide each state agency with an annual allocation of exemptions from the work requirements of 7 CFR 273.24 for ABAWDs.

Resource | Policy Memos | FNS-GD-2008-0018
Calculation of Value of ABAWD Exemptions in Cases Where States Overuse Their Allocations

This is a follow up to our November 8, 2007, memorandum to All Regional Food Stamp Program Directors concerning overuse of 15 percent Able Bodied Adults Without Dependents exemptions by state agencies.

Resource | Policy Memos | FNS-GD-2006-0029
FSP – 2-Year ABAWD Waivers – Using the Same Area for Multiple Waivers

This is a follow-up of our memorandum of February 3, 2006, authorizing 2-year waivers of the work requirements of 7 CFR 273.24 for able-bodied adults without dependents (ABAWDs). Since we issued the original memorandum, we have received several requests in which state agencies have requested waivers under which they proposed to include the same jurisdiction in waivers covering two different approval periods.

Resource | Policy Memos | FNS-GD-2021-0009
SNAP - Able-Bodied Adults Without Dependents Percentage Exemption Totals for Fiscal Year 2021

FNS has estimated the number of new discretionary exemptions each state has earned for fiscal year (FY) 2021 in the attached table. States that operated under a statewide waiver of the ABAWD time limit did not earn any new exemptions.

Resource | Comment Request
SNAP: Requirements and Services for Able-Bodied Adults without Dependents

The Food and Nutrition Act of 2008, as amended (the Act), limits the amount of time an able-bodied adult without dependents (ABAWD) can receive Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits to 3 months in a 36-month period, unless the individual is working and/or participating in a work program half-time or more, or participating in workfare.

Resource | Final Rule
Final Rule: FSP Employment and Training Program Provisions of the Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002

This rule finalizes the proposed provisions of a rule published on March 19, 2004 to amend Food Stamp Program regulations to codify Food Stamp Employment and Training (E&T) Program provisions of section 4121 of the Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002 (the Farm Bill).

Resource | FAQs/Q&As | FNS-GD-2018-0006
Characteristics of Able-Bodied Adults without Dependents

Characteristics of non-disabled adults aged 18 through 49 who live in childless households.

Resource | Research | Policy Analysis
Imposing a Time Limit on Food Stamp Receipt: Implementation of the Provisions and Effects on Food Stamp Program Participation

The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 imposed a work requirement and time limit on food stamp recipients viewed as fit to work – able-bodied adults without dependents (ABAWDs). ABAWD participants are limited to three months of benefits in a three-year period unless they meet a work requirement. This study provides a national picture of how states implemented the ABAWD provisions and who was affected.

Resource | FAQs/Q&As | FNS-GD-2013-0038
2008 Farm Bill Q&As

Questions and Answers for the 2008 Farm Bill