Resource | Research | General/Other
Nutrition Assistance In Farmers Markets: Understanding the Shopping Patterns of SNAP Participants

This study was undertaken to understand why some SNAP participants shop at farmers markets and others in the same geographic area do not.  Results suggest that SNAP participants buy most of their fresh fruits and vegetables at farmers markets.  Of those who shop at farmers markets, overall value including quality and price are major reasons for shopping at markets.  Of those who do not, reasons for not shopping at farmers markets centered on convenience.

Resource | Research
Farmers Market Incentive Provider Study
Resource | Research | Assessing/Improving Operations
Nutrition Assistance in Farmers Markets: Understanding Current Operations

The United States Department of Agriculture is seeking innovative ways to increase Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
(SNAP) participants’ access to fresh produce by increasing the number of farmers markets and direct marketing farmers authorized to accept SNAP benefits. This study describes how farmers markets and direct marketing farmers operate and their perceive d benefits and barriers to accepting SNAP.

Resource | Research | Assessing/Improving Operations
Nutrition Assistance in Farmers Markets: Understanding Current Operations - Formative Research Findings

This report presents the findings of the formative research undertaken to understand the current operations of nine farmers markets purposely selected by FNS to capture geography, market size, urban city, and variation in participation in nutrition assistance programs.

Resource | Research | Assessing/Improving Operations
Technical and Cost Feasibility of EBT Equipage in Farmers’ Markets and Mobile Food Retailers

Describe how participants redeem their food stamp (FS) benefits (including the number and types of stores frequented by typical clients, the timing and amount of purchases during the month, the frequency of benefit exhaustion, and the amount of benefits carried over into following months). And, identify redemption patterns across groups and analyze differences in redemption and shopping patterns if such exist (e.g., differences between participants with earnings and those without; differences between families with and without children; differences between geographic regions).